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Greek Museums

Diros Neolithic Museum

At the entrance of the Anemotrypa Cave. Pyrgos Dirou
Tel.: 27330 52233, 27310 23315
Open daily: 08:30 - 15:00 - Mondays closed - Entrance fee: 2,00 €

Before visiting the Anemotrypa Cave, one of the most important and beautiful caves in Greece, it would be very useful to visit the museum operating for a few years now at the cave's entrance. Through the findings of this museum, unique of its kind in Greece, visitors are given the opportunity to come into contact with the daily activities, ceremonial customs and artistic sensitivity of the people that inhabited the cave in the Late and Final Neolithic period from 4800 BC through approximately 3200 BC. Initially inhabited by a group of seamen attracted by abundance of potable water and the security it provided, the cave gradually evolved into a significant and populous community centre with cult temples and a cemetery. The findings displayed in the both juxtaposed showcases present unique scientific interest. Originating exclusively from the cave, the exhibits offer visitors a quite eloquent picture of the relatively closed Neolithic community, assisted greatly by the educational character of the display order. A map of the cave is posted on the right side of the entrance and right next to it there is a map showing the major Neolithic civilisation centres discovered in Greece. The showcases exhibit finds made of obsidian from the island of Milos, a valuable material for the times, stone and bone tools, weaving accessories, bones from animal skeletons, vessels of daily use, as well as figurines, jewelry and other small objects. At the far end of the hall, there are fragments of pottery and large urns decorated with embossed relief, displayed in open air. The second row of showcases display clay pottery, funeral vessels, painted urns and a series of objects dating back to the final years of the community's life before it was interrupted abruptly about 3200 BC by a severe earthquake as a result of which the mouth of the cave was blocked. A separate showcase in the centre of the hall displays the skeleton of a young woman in the original position it was found.

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